Find all sorts of resources here for moving your school along a path to zero waste.

These sorting signs can be downloaded to use in your lunchroom or feel free to use them as reference to create your own signs. Keep in mind that signs are most effective if they are color coded, use photos, show the most commonly used items in the lunchroom, and are placed at eye level. The order of collection containers and their corresponding signs is essential to the success of any sorting program. (See the Sorting Station section below for details about best practices for setting up a sorting station.)

Recycling: This set of signs is designed for schools that would like to recycle in the lunchroom. Lunchroom recycling requires a bucket or bin for collecting leftover liquid since all drink containers must be empty in order to be recycled. This set of signs also includes a sign for stacking trays. Stacking trays will greatly reduce the volume of landfill waste as well as the number of times the custodian needs to change the landfill bags. Click HERE for dual language signs (English/Spanish).

Recycling & Commercial Composting: This set of signs is designed for schools that would like to recycle and do commercial composting. Lunchroom recycling requires a bucket or bin for collecting leftover liquid since all drink containers must be empty in order to be recycled. This set of signs also includes a sign for stacking trays. Stacking trays significantly reduces the volume they take up, as well as the number of times the custodian needs to change the landfill bags. If your trays are compostable, the stacked trays can be added to the compost bin at the end of each lunch period. Click HERE for dual language signs (English/Spanish).

Recycling & Onsite Composting: This set of signs is designed for schools that would like to recycle and do onsite composting. Lunchroom recycling requires a bucket or bin for collecting leftover liquid since all drink containers must be empty in order to be recycled. This set of signs also includes a sign for stacking trays. Stacking trays significantly reduces the volume they take up, as well as the number of times the custodian needs to change the landfill bags. Click HERE for dual language signs (English/Spanish).

Share table signs: Share tables are a great way to prevent good food from going to landfills. A share table is a place where students can place items from a school meal if they choose not to eat them. These items are then made available to other children who may want or need another serving during or after the meal service or they can be donated to an outside organization. Contact your local health department before implementing a share table or food donation program to find out if local health and food safety codes in your area allow these practices. See the section on share tables in this Toolkit for more information.

Share Table Signs with Milk

Share Table Sign no Milk

 

Kitchen sorting signs: Recycling, Landfill, and Commercial Composting:

 

Sample signs for classroom/hallway/office recycling:

Option 1

Option 2

Sign attachment method: A best practice for sign placement is to attach signs directly above the sorting bins. If your sorting bins are against a wall, then they can easily be taped to the wall. But if the bins need to be located away from walls, here is a low-cost method for attaching them. The only materials needed are small hand clamps (available at hardware stores for about $1 each) and rulers or wood shims (also available at hardware stores).

 

     

 

 

SGA’s Lunchroom Sorting Guidance Presentation

The purpose of a sorting station is to separate material streams (to separate recyclables from landfill trash, for example). Here are some best practices and things to consider when setting up a sorting station:

Sequence of bins
The sequence or order that bins are located within a sorting station is important to efficient sorting. It helps for students to form a line and move through the station in one direction. 

Consider what students have on their lunch trays/lunch boxes and the most efficient way to get those materials sorted. 

Here are some tips for sequencing bins:

• Locate the liquids bin at the front of the station so that students can empty unfinished drinks before they have the chance to spill them.

• Locate the recycling bin immediately after the liquids bin since students will already be holding their emptied drink containers.

• If incorporating commercial composting, locate the compost bin after the landfill bin. This is because it is easier to first pick the plastic landfill trash off trays, then shake off the food scraps into the compost bin, compared to the other way around.

• If incorporating a share table into a sorting station, it helps to locate it at the very front of the station so students can focus on those items first. Some schools opt instead to locate a share table just after the food service counter (and not part of the sorting station) so that food service staff can more easily monitor it.

Note: Allowing individual students to sort their materials as soon as they are done eating, rather than having all students use the sorting station at dismissal, will also ease crowding at the station and reduce the overall time needed for the sorting process.

Chicago Public Schools Recycling Guide

Green Pages Directory for recycling other common items, including: Books, Cartridges/Inkjet Toner, Art Supplies (Solid Waste Agency of Northern Cook County)

Guides

How-to and Educational Videos

Additional Resources

Turn a Wasteful Lunch into a Zero Waste Lunch

What You Can Do To Help Prevent Wasted Food (USDA)

Use condiment dispensers instead of single-use condiment packets

Use bulk utensil and napkin dispensers instead of bundled utensil/napkin packets

Switch to washable utensils or lunch trays

Switch to recyclable or compostable packaging or serviceware

Evanston/Skokie School District 65: This case study focuses on how D65 has made huge strides towards becoming zero waste after years of hard work and determination. Thanks to dedicated parents, students, and staff, and key support at the district level, D65 is significantly reducing waste in two ways — sourcing compostable lunch trays and composting food scraps.

Spring Lake Elementary School: An Illinois school garden case study.

Zero Waste School Practices During COVID-19  (PDF of presentation slide deck from 9/2/2020 webinar. Click HERE for recording on SGA YouTube Channel, 1:30 hr)

Zero Waste Lunchrooms: The How and Why of Reducing Waste in Your School Lunchroom (Susan Casey, Seven Generations Ahead)

Fox River Valley Zero Waste Schools (Susan Casey, Seven Generations Ahead)